Governor Wolf, Senator Wiley, Reps. Harkins and Fabrizio Secure Critical Funding in Budget to Aid Erie

first_img July 14, 2016 Press Release,  Schools That Teach Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf, Senator Sean Wiley, and Representatives Pat Harkins and Flo Fabrizio today announced that the 2016-17 budget includes critical funding for the Erie School District. In the 2016-17 budget, the Erie School District received an increase of $3.3 million in basic education funding, an increase of $234,000 in special education funding, and an additional $4 million to aid the district financially.Over a two year period, Governor Wolf and legislators have secured more than $6.5 million in basic education funding for the Erie School District and $562,000 in special education funding.“The Erie School District, like too many districts across Pennsylvania, is still reeling from the devastating cuts to education made by the previous administration,” said Governor Wolf. “Working with Senator Wiley and Representatives Harkins and Fabrizio, we fought hard to secure additional funding for the district that is critical to placing it on solid financial footing. The budget that was completed yesterday includes more money to invest in our classrooms and our children, and it provides additional funding to help the district with its finances.”Going even further, Governor Wolf worked with Senator Wiley, and Representatives Harkins and Fabrizio to include a provision in the budget to provide the Erie School District with additional financial and technical support from the Department of Education.“We spent months making the case that Erie’s Public Schools cannot cut its way out of this hole and that their financial situation cannot be righted without an influx of funds,” said Senator Wiley. “Getting them out of the red and back to even was an important step, but one that is only a short-term fix. Erie’s Public Schools and other districts across this Commonwealth will be right back in the same situation next budget cycle if we don’t address the costs incurred by districts. I look forward to continuing to work on those necessary systemic changes moving forward.”“I’m very happy that things worked out,” said Rep. Harkins. “We’ve been working together in a bipartisan way since September with Superintendent Jay Badams to find a positive solution for all involved. I’m very glad we were able to come to an agreement that worked for everyone.”“I’m very pleased that the General Assembly and the Governor have recognized the dire financial situation of Erie’s Public Schools, and that by working collaboratively and collectively, we’ve been able to provide them with some relief,” said Representative Fabrizio.# # #Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf, Senator Wiley, Reps. Harkins and Fabrizio Secure Critical Funding in Budget to Aid Eriecenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

It feels like your companies dont give a damn You give a

first_img by Qingdao Haier Shootings at New Zealand Mosques Kill at Least 49 PeoplePrime Minister Jacinda Ardern identified the shootings as a terrorist attack. ShareVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseMuteCurrent Time 0:03/Duration 2:18Loaded: 29.01%0:03Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:15 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglish Sponsored Content Haier Smart Home Has the Solutionscenter_img Captions Audio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenFacebook said it struggled to identify the video of the New Zealand mosque shootings because of the use of a head-mounted camera by the gunman, which made it harder for its systems to automatically detect the nature of the video.“This was a first-person shooter video, one where we have someone using a GoPro helmet with a camera focused from their perspective of shooting,” Neil Potts, Facebook’s public policy director, told British lawmakers Wednesday.Terror footage from a first-person perspective “was a type of video we had not seen before,” he added. Because of the nature of the video, Facebook’s artificial intelligence—used to detect and prioritize videos that are likely to contain suicidal or harmful acts—did not work.Potts was giving evidence Wednesday to a committee of senior lawmakers in the U.K. as part of a parliamentary inquiry into hate crime. Representatives for Twitter and Alphabet’s Google and YouTube also gave evidence.Social media platforms, such as Facebook, have been facing scrutiny after the shooter accused of killing dozens of people in two mosques in New Zealand live-streamed the murders over the internet. The social media company came under sharp criticism for not taking the video down fast enough and for letting it be circulated and uploaded to other platforms like YouTube.At congressional hearings in the U.S. over the past two years, executives from Facebook and YouTube said they were investing heavily in artificial intelligence that would be able to find and block violent and graphic videos before anyone saw them. In a blog post following the attack, Facebook said that its AI systems are based on using many thousands of examples of content to train a system to detect certain types of text, imagery or video.Potts was also chastised by the committee’s chair, the Labour party’s Yvette Cooper, for not knowing the senior officer in charge of counter terrorism policing in the U.K., Neil Basu.“We’ve been told by the counter terrorism chief that social companies don’t report to the police incidents that clearly are breaking the law,” Cooper told Potts. “You may remove it, but you don’t report it.”Potts responded that he was “not familiar with the person you mentioned, or his statement,” and later apologized for not knowing him. He said, however, that Facebook doesn’t report all crimes to police but does report “imminent threats.”“These are places where government could be giving us more guidance,” Potts said.The committee investigating hate crime is separate to the one that recently recommended the British government take tougher measures to keep technology companies like Facebook in check, following a year-long inquiry into fake news and its impact on elections.Stephen Doughty, a Labour party lawmaker, directed broad and strongly-worded criticism at all three witnesses.“Your systems are simply not working and quite frankly it’s a cesspit,” he said, referring to the collective platforms’ content. “It feels like your companies don’t give a damn. You give a lot of rhetoric but you don’t take action.”Marco Pancini, director of public policy for YouTube, responded that “we need to do a better job and we are doing a better job,” adding that since an earlier hearing “we introduced a team that helps us better understand trends of violations of our policies by far-right organisations.”“That’s all wonderful but they’re clearly not doing a very good job,” Doughty replied.You May Like HealthFormer GE CEO Jeff Immelt: To Combat Costs, CEOs Should Run Health Care Like a BusinessHealthFor Edie Falco, an ‘Attitude of Gratitude’ After Surviving Breast CancerLeadershipGhosn Back, Tesla Drop, Boeing Report: CEO Daily for April 4, 2019AutosElon Musk’s Plan to Boost Tesla Sales Is Dealt a SetbackMPWJoe Biden, Netflix Pregnancy Lawsuit, Lesley McSpadden: Broadsheet April 4last_img read more

Worries Over Deteriorating Finances Of Teaching Hospitals

first_imgWorries Over Deteriorating Finances Of Teaching Hospitals The Wall Street Journal looks at how relationships between teaching hospitals and universities are fraying because of financial concerns. Medicare Advantage plans face scrutiny over allegations of overcharging and a healthcare report says consumers and providers feel the squeeze of rising health costs. This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Teaching hospitals have long been points of pride for major universities, and in recent years revenue from medical services has served as a lifeline for some schools that have struggled with falling state aid and pressure to slow tuition increases. Now the marriages between universities and their cash-cow clinical operations are starting to fray as changes stemming from the 2010 health-care law threaten to make university hospitals less profitable. (Korn, 4/22) Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years. Federal court records show at least a half dozen whistleblower lawsuits alleging billing abuses in these Medicare Advantage plans have been filed under the False Claims Act since 2010, including two that just recently surfaced. The suits have named insurers from Columbia, S.C., to Salt Lake City to Seattle, and plans which have together enrolled millions of seniors. Lawyers predict more whistleblower cases will surface. The Justice Department also is investigating Medicare risk scores. (Schulte, 4/23) Center for Public Integrity/NPR: More Whistleblowers Say Health Plans Are Gouging Medicare center_img Both health-care consumers and providers felt the squeeze of rising health-care costs in 2014 – with out-of-pocket costs for patients rising 11% — according to a TransUnion Healthcare report released Wednesday. (Helies, 4/22) The Wall Street Journal: Once Cash Cows, University Hospitals Now Source Of Worry For Schools Fox News: Survey: Out-Of-Pocket Costs For Health Care Up 11% last_img read more