Home of former Breakfast Creek Hotel publican hits the market

first_imgThis home at 89 Pring St, Hendra, is for sale. Picture: realestate.com.au.Mr Cavill’s lowset home is in a quiet, private neighbourhood on a large, 604 sqm block with landscaped gardens.The property is walking distance to Aviation High and Our Lady Help of Christians School and a short drive to other esteemed private schools. Greg and Jenny Cavill outside the Breakfast Creek Hotel.THE Brisbane home of former Breakfast Creek Hotel publican and sailing stalwart, the late Greg Cavill, is on the market.The member of one of Queensland’s leading hotel families, the Cavill family, recently passed away and his daughter, Jenny, is handling the sale of his Hendra home.The four-bedroom, two-bathroom house at 89 Pring Street — arguably Hendra’s finest street — is advertised for sale by offers through Leigh Kortlang and Jon Finney of Ray White AscotRecords show it was last bought for $540,000 in September 2001. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours agoThe back courtyard at the home at 89 Pring St, Hendra. Picture: realestate.com.au.The Cavill family took up the lease on Brisbane’s famous waterhole in 1926 and held it for 72 years. But while he was well known for his days at the helm of the Breakfast Creek Hotel, Mr Cavill was also the oldest surviving Commodore of Royal Queensland Yacht Squadron. MORE HOMES FOR SALE IN BRISBANE GIDDY UP FOR AUCTION LUXURY IN THE BUSH Veteran yachtsmen (L-R) Greg Cavill, Bill Warlow, Dennis Burchill, Bill Pryke and Colonel Johnson. Picture: David Kapernick.He was also the official starter for the 66th QantasLink Brisbane to Gladstone Yacht Race in 2014.He contested the race from 1950-1998 on five different yachts and was among the winning crew aboard the Norman Wright skippered Flying Saucer, which took line honours in 1955 in a race record of 41 hours 19 minutes and 4 seconds.center_img This home at 89 Pring St, Hendra, is for sale. Picture: realestate.com.au. Inside the home at 89 Pring St, Hendra. Picture: realestate.com.au.last_img read more

Political parties should refrain from “jingoistic” approaches to governance

first_imgDear Editor,Over the past few days, I have attended the Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) in Houston, Texas, with its expansive display by hundreds of companies and countries, including Guyana, as well as conference sessions and collateral events.Guyana is well represented at this conference, and it must be a fascinating reality check for many of us, I would think.I have always been aware that our oil and gas industry would be a boost to our economy, but must admit that what I have learnt during this conference has really opened my eyes to the enormity of the positive impact this sector can have on the quality of life of the Guyanese people; if we manage it well and confront some of the challenges, including social ills such as human trafficking, which are likely to intensify as our level of prosperity is heightened.I really hope that all Guyanese, especially our politicians, can come to grips with the reality that if they do what is right they could chart a course that would provide for every Guyanese to enjoy a quality of life about which they never dreamt.On Wednesday there was a session on Guyana, which focused on sustainable development of Guyana’s oil and gas industry. It was a good panel discussion. While much of the information was not new, what made it useful were the perspectives offered about the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (swot) which the sector must analyse and address.One panellist spoke of the “complex political structure” in Guyana, which I interpreted to be among the challenges which must be addressed if the sector is to realise its full potential to be of benefit to each and every Guyanese.I would hope that, in quick time, the political structure of Guyana would change via constitutional reform. In the meantime, however, it is my fervent wish that the political culture in Guyana would change even sooner, thereby providing for heightened collaboration among the major political parties, and drastic reduction in the real and/or perceived animosity which exists among them.Guyana has to have a predictable environment to facilitate investment, private sector and economic development, and job creation. This requires consultation and collaboration among the parties, which would provide for continuity of policies whenever there is a change in Government.In short, what I am proposing is that the major political parties refrain from their “jingoistic” approaches to governance, and work toward some form of unified governance which would not negate a reasonable plurality of outlook, but presuppose it.Seeking to eschew corruption in all its forms and at every level must be the pillar of their collaborative efforts, along with putting an end to political favouritism/loyalty in the appointments to key positions. Perhaps it is time that the major political parties seek to attract to their ranks and leadership persons with a greater commitment to ‘Putting Guyana First’. Failure to so do could torpedo the good life, of which the country is now positioned on its cusp.Some time ago, I attended a business meeting in Curacao at which Paul Keens Douglas was the keynote speaker at one of the luncheon sessions. In referring to “group think” of regional politicians, he said these guys “feel their countries are at the precipice of great developments, and all they have to do is take one great step forward.” Let’s hope this is not the current thinking of our Guyanese politicians.Regards,Wesley Kirtonlast_img read more