35 Vermont businesses to receive $2.4 million in REAP energy efficiency funds

first_imgWilliam Maclay Architects WaitsfieldPaul SachsBradfordE&E Hospitality LimitedArlingtonWest Mountain Inn ArlingtonWind: Recipient Project LocationReverse Osmosis or High Efficiency Arch systems: USDA Rural Development has selected 35 Vermont businesses to receive $2,364,617 Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) energy efficiency and energy improvement grants and loan guarantees.  Twenty-two businesses were announced today, by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, and are the final selections for the REAP funds this fiscal year. USDA Rural Development recognizes the importance of renewable energy and energy efficiency. said Rhonda Shippee, Acting State Director. We look forward to continued success in funding similar projects– helping finance projects that are good for the economy and good for the bottom line of the participating Vermont businesses.Recipients will use their awards for a variety of energy efficiency and renewable energy purposes. These awards will additional small wind, solar electric generation and lighting improvement projects to USDA Rural Developments energy program portfolio.As part of the selections, USDA Rural Development s REAP funds continue to be sought after by Vermont s agriculture producers.  Dubois Energy LLC will partner their loan guarantee and grant with State,  local, and private financing to purchase and install an anaerobic digester system to generate electricity and produce on farm bedding for their operation in Vergennes.  Monument Farms Three Gen, LLC in Weybridge, are also receiving a grant and loan guarantee to purchase and install an anaerobic digester system to produce electricity which they will sale to the local utility, and produce energy to heat hot water for the milk house.Twenty-seven awards, totaling $427,626, will be used by maple producers throughout the state for the purchase and installation of reverse osmosis equipment or a new high efficiency arch systems. These systems will reduce energy consumption and increase net farm income.REAP loan guarantees and grants can be used for renewable energy systems, energy efficiency improvements, feasibility studies and energy audits. These funds are not part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. For more information on the REAP program, which is authorized under the 2008 Farm Bill, please visit www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/farmbill/index.html(link is external).See below for a list of all projects receiving awards under this program.USDA Rural Development s mission is to increase economic opportunity and improve the quality of life for rural residents. Rural Development fosters growth in homeownership, finances business development, and supports the creation of critical community and technology infrastructure. Further information on our programs is available by contacting us at (802)828-6031 or by visiting USDA Rural Development s web site at www.rurdev.usda.gov/vt(link is external).Fiscal Year 2009 USDA Rural Development s Rural Energy for America Program selections: Damian BranonFairfieldRidgeview Farm, IncFairfieldCarlton Bertrand, Jr.SwantonScott BoyceRichfordWayne FifieldThetford CenterRodney & Glenda ParadeeSwantonJoseph A. JordanEssex Jct.Charles M. Cooley, Jr.MorrisvilleNorman Fecteau & David L. SteinhourRichfordMorse Farm Inc.MontpelierGary CoreyFairfieldClifford LaPointCraftsburyDouglas RoseLudlowDavid & Sharon DolloffLyndonvillePaul A. LaharAlbanyGabriel GervaisEast FairfieldRobert Lemire SrEssex Jct.Tator’s Sugar ShackSt. AlbansButternut Mountain FarmMorrisvilleFranklin YatesFairfieldPaul PalmerJeffersonvilleDaniel & Rose RoyerNewport CenterKenneth SaundersRupertFernand & Patricia GagneSwantonHoward & Carolyn CollinsNewport CenterRandi & Louise CalderwoodCraftsburyPriscilla WhiteFairfieldWalter Gladstone lighting improvementsBradfordPhoto Voltaic: Harvey McDonald small windDerby LineAnaerobic Digester Systems: Dubois Energy, LLCVergennesMonument Farms Three Gen, LLCWeybridge Source: Montpelier, VT, September 24, 2009 USDA Rural Development.last_img read more

Abortion: A tragic response to lack of choice

first_imgIt was, ironically, a pro-abortion senior nurse who told me I may be the only person these women would ever confide in. It’s a burden I never willingly sought, but will carry none the less.Stories of secret abortions to avoid further exacerbation of domestic violence. Stories of rape and incest. Employers who subtly threatened termination of job or denial of promotion if pregnancy resulted – or continued. Financial concerns. Educational restraints. Other children at home, some with special needs. Breakdowns of long term relationships.Not once did I come across women celebrating their abortion as an act of female empowerment, taking dominion and control over their reproductive destinies.Suddenly the pro-choice bumper sticker rhetoric looked shallow, meaningless and simply blatant lies.Even the women who were “pro-choice” and would likely make the same choice if they were in the same circumstances again, admitted their sorrow – acknowledgement of a child who was just not meant to be. Their stories were dotted with “if onlys”.If only.Society’s offer of help to the desperate woman? Kill her unborn child. How utterly offensive.It became obvious – abortion was not a choice, rather a tragic response to a lack of choices.Abortion isn’t illegal in this country. The system is set up with the intention of acknowledging the interests of the unborn and trying to balance that against the woman and her interests.If we were to fully liberalise our abortion laws, what will we see? There’s no reason to not anticipate very liberal American constructs. A clinic where a woman can walk in, part with a few hundred dollars, and be out the door by mid-afternoon.Right now, most abortions are done under the banner of a District Health Board. The system follows the law as much as those involved interpret it.Infection control and surgical care pathways are followed religiously, women with complicated histories are assessed and cared for properly to ensure no harm comes to them, and when the very rare complication does arise, they are dealt with quickly and competently. We’ve had no abortion deaths in this country since the Contraception, Sterilisation and Abortion Act passed in the late 70s.The system can pick up, and care for, girls and women who may be facing violent situations at home, domestic violence, rape, coercion. There is counselling, discussion of options, and health care professionals each step of the way.I don’t like abortion, but at least in this country we have a system that protects women from the worst the abortion industry can offer.For all the talk from the Greens, Labour and whoever else decides to throw their hat in, what will full liberalisation look like?Will our laws demand that abortions remain in hospitals? Demand a process through counselling and meeting with different health care professionals? Will it ensure we won’t have random clinics popping up in our poorest neighbourhoods with the cheapest of facilities, relaxed infection control, no resuscitation equipment, and staff who frequently operate outside their scope practice?Do we want a system like some of the more liberal states in America? Where women are herded through questionable clinics like cattle? Where the abortion lobby staunchly and frequently opposes standard clinic regulations and health checks?I don’t pretend that my experiences are the majority – I’m sure there are plenty of women who got through their abortion process without any crisis of conscience or long term emotional anguish.My concern is that all the women who’ve shared their sombre stories with me got through a pretty rigorous system which was supposed to protect them, but how many women will be hurried through a more liberalised version? What will their emotional futures look like?Liberalising abortion just comes across as the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff. Like so many of our problems in this country, we’re too busy making bigger band aids instead of addressing why there’s so many sharp objects laying about.READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff-nation/assignments/share-your-news-and-views/17875538/Abortion-A-tragic-response-to-lack-of-choice Stuff co.nz 31 March 2017Family First Comment: An excellent Op-Ed“For all the talk from the Greens, Labour and whoever else decides to throw their hat in, what will full liberalisation look like? Will our laws demand that abortions remain in hospitals? Demand a process through counselling and meeting with different health care professionals? Will it ensure we won’t have random clinics popping up in our poorest neighbourhoods with the cheapest of facilities, relaxed infection control, no resuscitation equipment, and staff who frequently operate outside their scope practice? Do we want a system like some of the more liberal states in America? Where women are herded through questionable clinics like cattle? Where the abortion lobby staunchly and frequently opposes standard clinic regulations and health checks? I don’t pretend that my experiences are the majority – I’m sure there are plenty of women who got through their abortion process without any crisis of conscience or long term emotional anguish. My concern is that all the women who’ve shared their sombre stories with me got through a pretty rigorous system which was supposed to protect them, but how many women will be hurried through a more liberalised version? What will their emotional futures look like? Liberalising abortion just comes across as the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff. Like so many of our problems in this country, we’re too busy making bigger band aids instead of addressing why there’s so many sharp objects laying about.”www.chooselife.org.nz Then I became a nurse.Early on I directed my career away from women’s health. I didn’t want to have to deal with my niggling conscience when assisting with abortion or sexual health. I didn’t want to appear to be “judging” a patient, I didn’t want to be unprofessional.So, imagine my surprise when time and time again I met women who began pouring out their stories of grief to me. Stories regarding their abortions. Common questions in nursing assessments – previous surgical histories, any reactions to drugs etc – led to very personal abortion stories.These stories were truly heart-wrenching, and I felt as if I was intruding into an aspect of their life that, even as a healthcare professional, was not my place to be. It was too intimate.last_img read more