Maine Regulators to Re-consider Terms over Fairpoint’s Acquisition of Verizon

first_imgMAINE REGULATORS TO RE-CONSIDER TERMS OVER FAIRPOINT’S ACQUISITION OF VERIZON(January 16, 2008) — The Maine Public Advocate is suggesting that the states regulators revisit the conditions they approved earlier this month for Fairpoints acquisition of Verizon. The readjustment was suggested after The Vermont Public Service Department agreed on a deal with Fairpoint that differed from terms made between the company and Maine.The Vermont Public Service Department, which represents consumers, reached an agreement with the phone companies on January 8. That agreement is now before the Vermont Public Service Board, which acts as the states regulatory body and has the final say in the decision.Vermonts pending terms and conditions involve a performance enhancement plan that requires Fairpoint to put $12.5 million aside annually for improvements and advancements in service quality if certain standards are not met. Maines deal with the company requires Verizon to provide Fairpoint with more than $235 million for debt reduction. Maines public advocate is worried that certain conditions being debated in the Vermont deal would mean that some of that money will be used for other purposes. Maines public advocate is concerned that conditions of the Vermont deal will threaten Fairpoints financial viability.This backwards step in the drawn out struggle over the approval of Fairpoint’s acquisition of Verizon comes after the Federal Communications Commission January 9 approval of the transfer of Verizon’s landline business in Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine to FairPoint Communications, Inc (NYSE: FRP).The FCC commissioners voted 3-2, with both Democrats voting against, to approve the assignment of authorizations and licenses associated with the proposed acquisition by FairPoint of Verizons wireline operations in Northern New England.The FCC order concludes, “We find that no significant public interest harms are likely to result from the merger, and that public interest benefits are likely to occur.”In dissenting, Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein wrote, in part: “I am particularly concerned about these issues because Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire have an exceptionally high percentage of rural residents. Consumers in these rural areas, despite the efforts of state and local governments, face some of the lowest levels of broadband penetration in the country. A rural-focused company may provide real benefits for the consumers in this region, but more careful attention to the benefits proffered seems warranted here, particularly given the size and scale of the transaction. Like a python swallowing an elephant, the acquiring company here will be taking the reins of an entity that is approximately six times larger than its current size.”Yet, inexplicably, there are no special measures in this Order to address the concerns about broadband deployment, wholesale service, or service quality for customers in these three states. The Order itself does not wrestle in any serious way with the ultimate question for consumers, as posed by the consumer commenters, of what level of service these new customers will be receiving and at what price. Instead, this Order takes at face value assertion after assertion without engaging in meaningful analysis. I might have been persuaded that, with the proper analysis and conditions, this merger could serve the public interest. Sadly, neither is offered in this Order.”Commenting on the FCC’s approval, Gene Johnson, chairman and CEO of FairPoint, said, “In providing the approval for the necessary license transfers related to this merger, the FCC has recognized this transaction is in the best interest of consumers and businesses. As we continue to make progress toward closing this transaction, we look forward to serving our new customers in northern New England and offering enhanced communications products and services.”The Order can be found at:http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-07-226A1.doc(link is external)last_img read more

12 ways you’re sabotaging your career

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Jacquelyn SmithWe all have bad habits. Sometimes we we’re not even aware of them, or the effect they have on our lives or careers.“In fact, many of us have habits that sabotage our relationships, work flow, productivity, and bottom line results,” says Sylvia Hepler, a career development specialist and author of “Learning Leadership Through Loss.” “They can also sabotage our professional future.”Here are 12 common bad habits and behaviors that can seriously hurt your career:1. Criticizing your boss. Whispering behind his back, carping to her face, or making your supervisor out to be wrong, pathetic, or inept puts you in the danger zone, Hepler says. “If you’re doing this, don’t expect to land a promotion or last there.” continue reading »last_img read more

Classic Queenslander a home owner’s dream

first_img28 Hooper St, Belgian Gardens“You absolutely feel like you’re in an authentic Queenslander, even through there is an extension,” he said. “We’ve had a lot of families look through the property, as well as couples looking to create their dream Queenslander.” 28 Hooper St, Belgian Gardens Queenslanders and it’s very rare that I see one that is in such good condition,” he said. More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020“It’s in a fantastic street with other character homes and it’s very nicely positioned on the block so that it’s off the road to enable privacy. “The lattice work also opens up and you get a good breeze and view.”The house has a practical floorplan with access to the kitchen, bedroom, study and main lounge from the front wrap-around veranda. The rear wing has three of the five bedrooms, as well as a second living area. The house is filled with classic Queenslander features such as tongue-and-groove walls, gunstock french doors, 12ft ceilings, casement windows, polished floorboards, original wooden louvres and liftout lattice work over the veranda. Mr Watson said the house had plenty of space to accommodate a large family. 28 Hooper St, Belgian GardensA GRAND old Queenslander big enough to fit the largest of families is waiting for a new owner to snap up the Belgian Gardens property.28 Hooper St has five bedrooms, one bathroom and two-car accommodation on a 1020 sqm block. It’s been listed for sale for offers over $599,000.North Ward Realty selling agent Tarquinn Watson said the property had been immaculately maintained.“I’ve had a lot to do withcenter_img 28 Hooper St, Belgian Gardens“It’s a really big house with two distinct living areas and there is also an extension,” he said.“Often when you see a Queenslander with an extension it doesn’t match, but this one flows perfectly.“If you wanted a project you could certainly lift the house and everything underneath is already concreted, so you could use it for storage.”The large rear deck is perfect for entertaining and looks out over the backyard, which is low-maintenance.There is also plenty of room for a swimming pool. Mr Watson said the house had kept the charm of the time period it was built.last_img read more