Wakenaam businessman killed during attempted robbery in city

first_imgA Wakenaam, Essequibo Island, businessman was shot and killed on Tuesday, after two bandits attempted to rob him of his bag. The incident occurred sometime around 11:05h on Alexander Street, between Regent and Robb Streets, Georgetown.Dead is 26-year-old Mahendra Persaud, called “Amar”, of Lot 22 Good Success, Wakenaam. The man, who ran his family-owned supermarket, got married in February.Investigators at the scene following Tuesday’s shootingDead: Businessman Mahendra PersaudGuyana Times understands that Persaud was on his weekly trip to Georgetown to get goods for the business and was in the front passenger seat in the parked vehicle along with his driver on Alexander Street in front of the Torginol building, when two men road up alongside him on a CG motorcycle.As he was existing the vehicle, one of the men whom was armed demanded that he hand over the bag which contained a large sum of money; however, Persaud put up resistance. A struggle then ensued between the businessman and the bandit during which Persaud was shot.The 26-year-old fell to the ground but held on to the bag as the armed man continued his attempt to relieve him of it. At this point, a licensed firearm holder who was in the area pulled out his weapon and went to Persaud’s aid. However, the bandit saw the armed man approaching and let go of the bag, and began running.Further information revealed that as the bandit was running in the direction of Robb Street, the licensed firearm holder opened fire in his direction. There was an exchange of gunfire between the two men during which the bandit was reportedly hit. Nevertheless, the injured bandit managed to escape as his accomplice was waiting at the corners of Robb and Alexander Streets.On the other hand, as gunshots ran out, the driver of a car that was approaching the scene reportedly panicked and ran over Persaud, who was lying at the corner of the road. The injured businessman was picked up by his driver and immediately rushed to the Georgetown Public Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival (DoA).Persaud reportedly sustained three gunshot wounds, one to his neck and two others to his chest.Meanwhile, at the Georgetown Public Hospital, the young man’s aunt,Dr Koushilyia Persaud, who is a staff at the medical facility, related that she was informed of the shooting by their driver and immediately rushed to Accident and Emergency (A&E) Unit where her worst fears were confirmed.The woman said that her nephew’s parents separated, so he grew up with her and her parents. “He and his younger brother were brought up by my parents and so we are all very close… I can’t believe that he is gone… he used to come visit me every time he is in town and would bring me lunch,” the grieving woman lamented.The aunt described the 26-year-old as a friendly, non-confrontational, funny and helpful young man who just began life, having got married just two months ago.Back home in Wakenaam, the news of Persaud’s death spread, leaving relatives and friends shocked and dumbfounded. Persons began gathering at his home to extend condolences to his family. The man’s friends even blocked off the street in front of his home with motorcycles and vehicles as they mourned his untimely demise.They described him as a very independent and consoling friend who is always willing to lend a helping hand to whomever is in need. Many persons even took to social media on Persaud’s facebook page, expressing their shock and sympathy over his sudden death.According to Police reports, the bag that Persaud had in his possession was recovered and handed over to relatives. The Police also revealed in a statement that a man was seen attempting to change the number plate of the vehicle that had run over the Wakenaam businessman. He has since been arrested and told investigators that he is a mechanic who was asked to replace the number plate by the owner. The car has been impounded.The Police said they are yet to arrest the driver of the car. Nevertheless, Head of the Criminal Investigations Department (CID) Wendell Blanhum told Guyana Times that they are looking for an individual who is known to the Police.The Crime Chief disclosed that investigators were able to obtain CCTV footage from the area and were able to identify one of the suspects. Investigations are continuing.last_img read more

Ebola and Sanitation

first_imgLast week, Liberians were poised at the bus park, awaiting the announcement of an Ebola free nation on May 9.  This is great news for the small West African Nation that found herself increasingly isolated by July through December of 2014.  Liberia was one of the epicenters in the West African sub region that was badly hit by the deadly epidemic. According to the statistics of previously affected countries by the Centers for Disease Control, Liberia recorded the highest death toll of 4716 out of 10564[1]  total cases of suspected, probable and laboratory confirmed cases. Faced with economic, socio- cultural and health- induced sanctions, nearly all International flights were suspended, with a drastic decline in trade, lowering investment, widespread economic speculation, thus bringing an entire nation to a monumental stop.The pace of a nation gradually recovering from a devastating 14-year civil war was stopped at an abrupt and uncertain end. Gloom hovered over Monrovia. The panic that characterized the civil war became more apparent-fleeing internationals, lowering economic activities, mass movement of people, fear, pandemonium, humiliating interaction with outsiders, unfavorable international news coverage, etc. Liberia was nearing point zero. A mid-term election for the Senate was postponed from October to November, sending a message that the health of a nation was more paramount than meeting a constitutional deadline. The hysteria began when Liberian government consultant Patrick Sawyer, died in Nigeria of Ebola. The news went viral; sending chills across Africa that Liberians were carriers of the Ebola virus, like fruit bats — the apparent natural habitat of the virus. Barely months after, the World was shocked when Thomas Eric Duncan was diagnosed of Ebola on the shores of the United States of America. Duncan, showed no signs of the virus, passed through International health protocols, and travelled to America. International media zoomed in on Liberia and the circus began.  Fear was alive. Long standing deeply entrenched stereotypes of Africans resurfaced.  A world wide campaign by Africans went viral: ‘I am an African and not a Virus’, ‘I’m a Liberian, not a virus’. Celebrated Beninoise Singer and Musician Angelique Kidjo narrated her ordeal in a moving article in the New York Times, ‘Don’t let Ebola dehumanize Africa’. She explained how naïve and evil preconceptions about Africa had resurfaced. Her encounter with a taxi driver in New York, who stigmatized her of the Ebola virus only because she was West African, summed it all.  The story of Kidjo is a tip of the iceberg of larger stories; wrapped in fear that many Africans, the world over, endured about the negative impact of the Ebola virus disease.   In Liberia, an effort to quarantine a huge slum community which is one of the ways of containing the virus went amok when residents clashed with law enforcement officers that resulted in the death of a teenager.But, with all the good news of an Ebola free Liberia, there are strong concerns of an Ebola free sub region, and ultimately, a world free of Ebola with a possibility of a vaccine for the virus.  The Global Community must not see Ebola as a neglected African infectious disease, but an international emergency. As the examples of Duncan, Sawyer, the Spanish nurse, and other foreign nationals that contracted the virus showed, Ebola is an unknown serial killer. A concerted global effort to tackle Ebola and other neglected infectious diseases should be sustained. Africa has borne the brunt of neglect and stigma of diseases she did not create. African governments should collaborate on disease surveillance and prevention mechanisms aimed at protecting their borders and citizens. The war on Ebola and other infectious diseases is like a war on terror and can’t be fought alone. In Liberia, the culture of shaking hands was permanently curtailed bringing a socio-cultural gap among the people who are accustomed to greeting with handshakes and hugs. Every home was manned with a bucket of water mixed with bleach for hand washing.  In the absence of a vaccine and treatment for Ebola, one of the perceived antidotes was good sanitation and hygiene. Ebola has left a sobering message that sanitation is a hallmark of long-term sustainable efforts in combating diarrhea, colorea and other diseases that present  symptoms akin to Ebola . Driving in Monrovia, I spotted a sign that read.’ Don’t Pepee Here’ A sanitation message that forbids people from urinating in public places. Ironically, few minutes later, three middle aged men descended on the sign and urinated profusely.  This is scary. Messages about Ebola awareness and prevention are tied to basic personal hygiene and public sanitation. Messages of constant hand washing with soap and clean water are widespread with a bucket of water posted at every entrance nowadays in Liberia. The Ebola virus is believed to be fast spreading through wastes, urine, feces, vomits, etc.  Hence, proper control of the virus means adequate sanitation.The former spirited city mayor of Monrovia, Mary Broh, was known by her fierce reputation for cleaning up the City. Every first Saturday in Monrovia is recognized as a day of general clean up, famously referred to as Mary Broh day. Liberians should not be fixated on counting the days of an Ebola free Liberia, but should be changing attitudes towards sanitation, personal hygiene, adequate preparedness in response to health and other emergencies. Health authorities should investigate reports of Ebola victims buried in shallow graves in parts of Monrovia, research dumpsites were Ebola waste materials were disposed of, all aimed at preventing a possible resurgence of the virus. As Liberia approaches the rainy season, all bolts must be tied in ensuring that sanitation remains a hallmark in the fight against the return of the serial killer.About the AuthorLekpele M. Nyamalon is a writer and poet from Liberia, an OSIWA Poetry residency fellow and the 2015 winner of World Poetry Day contest organized by Young People Today. He can be reached at nyamalon23@gmail.com Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more