Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz) HY2018 Interim Report

first_imgTanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2018 interim results for the half year.For more information about Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz)  2018 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileTanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TPCC) is a leading cement producer in Tanzania. The company produces cement for the local market and for export to countries in Central and East Africa. The company owns, operates and manages cement factories, grinding plants and terminals as well as cement retail and distribution outlets. TPCC markets its cement products under the following brands; Twiga Extra, Twiga Jenja, Twiga Plus and Twiga Ordinary. TPCC was founded in 1959 by Cementia Holdings AG of Switzerland; nationalised in 1973 and privatised in 1998. It is a subsidiary of Scancem International DA, which has been consolidated into Heidelberg Cement Group of the Federal Republic of Germany and is now known as Heidelberg Cement Africa (HC Africa). Heidelberg Cement Africa operates in seven sub-Saharan countries and has its headquarters in Oslo, Norway. Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited is listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Ocado shares: should I follow this top-performing fund and buy?

first_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Edward Sheldon, CFA | Friday, 4th December, 2020 | More on: OCDO Ocado shares: should I follow this top-performing fund and buy? Image source: Getty Images I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Edward Sheldon owns shares in Amazon and Hargreaves Lansdown. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Amazon and Tesla. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Hargreaves Lansdown and recommends the following options: long January 2022 $1920 calls on Amazon and short January 2022 $1940 calls on Amazon. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. One thing I often do as part of my investment research is look at what stocks the top-performing funds are holding. I find that this can be an excellent source of investment ideas.Recently, I was examining the holdings of the Baillie Gifford Global Discovery Fund. This is the top-performing global equity fund on Hargreaves Lansdown over the last five years with a return about 210%. Looking at the top 10 holdings, one thing struck me – Ocado (LSE: OCDO) was the second largest (with a weight of 4.2%) behind Tesla.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…That got me wondering. Should I buy Ocado shares myself?Ocado shares: the investment caseOcado has two things going for it right now. Firstly, as a pure online grocer, it’s the fastest growing supermarket in the UK.In September, the company – which has now partnered with M&S – said retail revenue for the 13 weeks to 30 August grew 52% as the channel shift to online grocery in UK continued. More recently, in early November, the group said trading has remained strong through the fourth quarter of the current financial year. It also said it continues to see high demand as consumers migrate to online grocery in record numbers.Clearly, this side of the business has momentum right now. Given that its market share is still under 2%, there could be plenty more growth to come here.But the retail side of the business is only part of the story with Ocado. The really exciting part, in my view, is its technology offering, the Ocado Smart Platform (OSP). Built to change the nature of grocery e-commerce globally, this is an end-to-end suite of solutions for operating online grocery businesses. The automation technology helps other retailers increase productivity, enhance flexibility, and generate higher profit margins.Ocado has already signed a number of key deals for its OSP technology with major supermarket groups around the world, including Kroger in the US, Groupe Casino in France, and Aeon in Japan. And looking ahead, it believes that it’s likely to see more demand for its technology from current and prospective partners. That’s mostly due to the accelerated shift to online grocery shopping as a result of Covid-19.No profitsNow, while this all sounds very promising, it’s important to realise that Ocado is not making a profit. This year, analysts expect the company to generate a net loss of about £170m. This means Ocado shares are higher risk. Generally speaking, I avoid companies that aren’t yet profitable. I prefer to invest in companies that can demonstrate a strong track record of profitability. These types of companies tend to be lower risk.That said, unprofitable companies can turn out to be amazing investments. Just look at Amazon. It was unprofitable for years but has delivered enormous returns for long-term investors.Should I invest?Overall, I think Ocado shares could be worth a small investment as a speculative growth play. The long-term growth potential looks significant, in my view. Not only should the group enjoy growth from its retail segment, but it should also see strong long-term growth from its automation solutions division.That said, it’s riskier than other FTSE 100 growth stocks simply because there are no profits. Enter Your Email Addresscenter_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. See all posts by Edward Sheldon, CFAlast_img read more

Presiding Bishop’s opening remarks to Executive Council

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET April 18, 2012 at 12:15 pm It is absolutely astonishing to me how the leader of a Christian church can continually avoid mentioning the name of Jesus Christ in her public comments and reflections. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Canon George F. Woodward III says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA April 18, 2012 at 12:17 pm Maybe I should clarify – an oblique reference to the “body of Christ” is so sanitized. Easy to avoid dealing with the person of Jesus and the reality of his bodily Resurrection and all that follows from that. I just don’t understand it. Really and truly. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS April 18, 2012 at 9:08 pm ++Bishop Jefferts-Schori is so unfailingly articulate and discerning. I consider our branch of Christ’s Church to be uniquely blessed and privileged to enjoy her leadership. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC April 18, 2012 at 6:21 pm Thank you, Katharine, for a well articulated, future imagining statement to which I say AMEN! We should work together to build on our strengths and core values, acknowledge our weaknesses, speak the truth in love, articulate the gospel with joy and conviction and move into a future of leading our communities into places they might never have imagined they might go. Adelante con esperanza y fe! April 20, 2012 at 8:48 am Father, it would seem to me that you do not see the present danger in churches of all denominations. There are so many unchurched people today and many of them have forgotten what religion is. Whenever I hear someone say “body of Christ” I only think of Jesus Christ, who else could she be referring to. If she only said Jesus would that also not be acceptable to you?These are trying times for all churches and society, including the government are getting further and further away from religion. My guess is that you are from a wealthy parish, if so you should take a look at the small parishes and see how they are struggling month to month to stay open, all to spread the word of Jesus’s love for all.In the future you should comment on the important things facing religion today. Jenny Vervynck says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group April 18, 2012 at 9:43 pm You are meant to know who the head of the body is. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Executive Council April 2012, Press Release Service Gerry Bee says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Fr. Darin Lovelace says: April 19, 2012 at 4:35 pm Bold, courageous, insightful, intelligent, humble, vulnerable . . . it is a difficult season, indeed, and we have a fine leader who dares invite us to follow her in her following of Christ. Thank you, Bishop Katharine. Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments (7) Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Rev. Janet Campbell says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Posted Apr 18, 2012 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Jim Hunt says: Executive Council, [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori addressed the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council April 18 at the beginning of the council’s three-day meeting in Salt Lake City. This is council’s last meeting of the 2010-2012 triennium. Jefferts Schori’s remarks follow in full.Executive Council18 April 2012Salt Lake CityOpening RemarksThe Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchI want to thank all of you for your service in this triennium. I know it has been a very difficult time for almost all, and I think it’s important for us to reflect on the larger context in which our work has been done over the last three years.When we began our work together in late 2009, we were just past a major budget cut that forced a public and painful reduction in church center staff. It was prompted by the economic crisis that began in 2008, which became far worse than anyone expected. But this economic crisis only hurried a reality that has been emerging for some time. The Episcopal Church, like many of the other well-established churches in the United States and in the west – and not just the western United States – , is declining in numbers, financial strength, and societal influence. This church once was the established and state church in some of the American colonies, and it has continued to act as though it were established for a very long time. Well, my friends, that time is over, gone, and done with. I must note that we have never been established in the other 15 nations where we are present today, and those parts of this church have had to learn other ways of relating to the larger society – and American Episcopalians can learn from that experience. The laws under which the church exists in Latin America and Europe are an example – in some places, like Germany, this church is regulated like a sports club, rather than a church.We are living in post-establishment times, and as a church, we are beginning to recognize that reality. It has brought an enormous amount of grief. The struggles over inclusion are a symptom, but only part of the response to losing a position and way of being that to many people has seemed intrinsic to being an Episcopalian. The post-establishment reality brings grief in abundance as former ways of living, governing, and privilege disappear. Like all kinds of grief, it can elicit anger, denial, and attempts to go back to some remembered golden age. None of those responses heals the grief. Nor can we fix the grief by tinkering with details. Only by living through the grief and loss, and beginning to embrace the possibilities and opportunities for new life will we ultimately find healing. We are a people who believe in resurrection, and we live in a season when acting out of that belief is absolutely essential.The difficulties that this body has experienced in the past triennium are not the fault of any one person, structure, or decision. They are a symptom of collective grief. We have three days together, which I hope will be used for forgiveness, a search for understanding, and letting go. I want to thank all of you for the persistence to stay the course, even when the dynamics have been painful. Let’s see what healing we can find in the next 72 hours, and then carry that will toward healing out into the larger church. Your willingness to endure these difficulties has been sacrificial, both as a faithful act of holiness, and as a sacramental act on behalf of others.Grieving the death of an era is necessary, and it will be fruitful as we invest in the next season of this body’s life. There are profoundly important opportunities before us. I believe the Spirit is inviting us into a significantly different way of being the body of Christ, in which we begin by remembering that the body already has a head. That head is not this body, or General Convention, and indeed that head doesn’t reside anywhere tangible – except as we begin to discern and discover how the spirit is at work among us and around us.That spirit is inviting us to let go of what is dead and embrace the new life that’s emerging. We’re looking toward a church that is more varied and less rigidly controlled, more networked and less directed. This new church is going to be more organic, more profoundly a body with uniquely gifted parts, each one honored and blessed for the service of God’s mission. It’s going to need different kinds of communication and responsiveness. We are already beginning to live into some of those ways, and others are still waiting to be discovered. None of us knows exactly what this church is going to look like – and that scares some folks to death, even more than the dying that has already been. I don’t know what is coming, none of us knows exactly what’s coming, this body doesn’t know what the next shape will be. We are being invited into a more truly communal process of discernment, a listening to the spirit that is patient and alert enough to help us all embrace that green blade rising.We will be more faithful, and far more effective, in that discernment work if we can let go of suspicion, assumptions about others’ motives, and power politics – all of which are based in fear and scarcity. We do know that perfect love casts out fear, and when we can remember how deeply and completely love dwells within us, the fear does begin to recede.I want to invite this body to celebrate the life that has been – both here in the Executive Council and in the wider church. Celebrate what is good and what is gone, give thanks and let it go. One of the realities about grief is that it comes in different ways and on different schedules to different parts of the body. Be gentle with the parts that are angry or depressed, be watchful with those who are still in denial, and be encouraging with those who are beginning to dream a new church. And give thanks in all things, for in God’s economy, it all works together for good. Remember that you are beloved, and give thanks. Remember that the Holy One has called you friend, and do the same for one another. And start dreaming, for the good news is that there is enormous energy in this body for growth and newness – and the seeds are already springing forth.Let us rejoice in the power of the Spirit. Alleluia, alleluia! Presiding Bishop’s opening remarks to Executive Council Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Fr. Darin Lovelace says: Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

UTO-supported medical mission to South Sudan postponed

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab United Thank Offering An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET UTO-supported medical mission to South Sudan postponed Armed conflict continues to rage across the country Sudan & South Sudan, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Lynette WilsonPosted Jan 9, 2014 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing A displaced mother carries her sick child at a United Nations hospital at Tomping camp, where some 15,000 displaced people who fled their homes are sheltered by the UN, near South Sudan’s capital Juba Jan. 7, 2014. REUTERS/James Akena[Episcopal News Service] A five-member group bound for a refugee camp in South Sudan has postponed its medical mission as a result of intense fighting that has killed an estimated 10,000 people and displaced 200,000 more in the fledgling east Africa nation.The mission group, mostly Episcopalians from the Diocese of Colorado, had planned to visit Yida, a refugee camp in Unity State, South Sudan, home to upwards of 70,000 people who’ve fled the pre-existing violence that has for at least two years plagued the oil-rich Nuba Mountains region, an area mostly allied with South Sudan but under the control of the government of Sudan, to the north.Yida, considered an outpost for Anglicans, lay and clergy, from the Diocese of Kadugli, is located in South Kordofan on the Sudan side of the border, where the Sudanese army and separatist rebel forces have engaged in armed conflict since June 2011.In 2013, the Diocese of Colorado, which has a close, informal companion relationship with the Diocese of Kadugli, received a $26,625 grant from the United Thank Offering to carry out primary medical care training for women health workers from Kadugli at Yida.“[The intention] was to begin to build a cadre of people to train other people,” said Anita Sanborn, a member of the mission group and president of the Colorado Episcopal Foundation, which is administering the grant for the diocese.The mission group was scheduled to leave for South Sudan on Jan. 5 and to begin training at the camp, where many of the region’s displaced people come and go, on Jan. 10, but postponed the trip because of the most recent conflict.Fighting erupted in Juba, the nation’s capital, on Dec. 15 following a political dispute between President Salva Kiir and his former deputy, Riek Machar. In the three weeks since, the fighting has spread to seven of 10 states and has created a humanitarian crisis in South Sudan.The group plans to regroup and carry out the training in a different refugee camp serving Sudanese refugees, either in Kenya or Uganda, likely in March or April, once Bishop of Kadugli Andudu Adam Elnail, who himself has spent much of the last two years in exile and for the moment is in Colorado, returns to the region and identifies an alternative location.Many of the people living in the camps are uneducated and don’t know general health principles, and when it comes to caring for newborns, the things you do in the first five minutes in the life of a baby that can increase their survival rate, said mission team member Dr. Michaleen “Mickey” Richer, a pediatrician with more than 25 years’ experience in global health, the majority of it in Sudan and South Sudan.Bishop of Kadugli Andudu Adam Elnail took this photo of children in the Yida refugee camp in Unity State on his last visit to the camp.The UTO grant will allow the mission team to empower women living in refugee camps and caves, where access to medical professionals is limited or nonexistent, with the basic health-care skills and hygiene skills needed for survival, according to the award summary.“So often we see things on the news and we don’t know how to help, we feel hopeless; UTO is a daily way to participate in changing the world around us,” said the Rev. Heather Melton, UTO coordinator. “When you put coins in the [blue] box and give thanks for something good in your life, those coins go to help people who are out there on our behalf trying to transform unjust structures of society.”The Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan, home to 2 million members, has 31 dioceses — 26 of them in South Sudan, where it is one of the nation’s largest non-government organizations and has played a role in reconciliation in the aftermath of a two-decades-long civil war fought largely between the Arab and Muslim north and rebels in the Christian-animist south.“The church in South Sudan is seeing the challenges of development,” said Elnail in a Jan. 8 telephone call with ENS, adding that it is operating with limited resources.In addition to ministering to his people, who now are spread across Egypt, Uganda, Kenya, South Sudan and Sudan, the bishop has advocated peace and reconciliation, speaking out both in Africa and North America. The solution to the conflict, he said, “lies in political dialogue, not in fighting.”Sudan’s warring parties signed a Comprehensive Peace Agreement in 2005, ending the civil war that killed more than 2 million people and displaced an estimated 7 million more. South Sudan officially gained its independence from Sudan on July 9, 2011. In February 2012, tribal violence erupted in South Sudan’s Jonglei State.The Diocese of Colorado has long supported Sudanese refugees, who began arriving in Colorado more than a decade ago. Many of the refugees belonged to the Episcopal Church of Sudan and found their way to diocesan churches, like St. John’s Cathedral in Denver, which is home to a Sudanese Congregation, said Sanborn.When South Sudan gained its independence, the diocese shifted its focus from helping the diaspora to fostering schools, training in leadership development, and support for clergy in the newly developing nation, as well as engaging in advocacy efforts at home.In addition to providing necessary assistance and training, it’s important for Americans and people of the Episcopal Church to bear witness and provide information for U.S.-based advocacy efforts, said Sanborn, who is a former board member of the American Friends of the Episcopal Church in Sudan, or AFRECS, as it is commonly known.“I know as Americans we are really practical, and people often ask ‘what good does it do for you to go over and do two weeks of training?’’’ she said. “What is un-measurable is the hope that our presence stimulates in people who feel betrayed by their own leaders. We can bring a message to the people who are there to keep going, they will not be forgotten.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.  Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Nebraska churches expand ministries to serve communities devastated by floods

first_imgNebraska churches expand ministries to serve communities devastated by floods An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Volunteers prepare food for distribution April 27 at Church of the Holy Spirit in Bellevue, Nebraska, through the church’s mobile food pantry ministry. Photo: Church of the Holy Spirit[Episcopal News Service] The catastrophic floods that hit Nebraska and neighboring states in March submerged whole neighborhoods underwater and turned some riverbend communities like Fremont into isolated outposts surrounded by water. The rising Platte and Elkhorn rivers blocked roads into and out of the Fremont area for days.“Fremont was basically an island,” said the Rev. Sarah Miller, whose small congregation at St. James’ Episcopal Church has been on the front lines of relief and recovery efforts.At the same time, the Missouri River swallowed parts of the Omaha suburb of Bellevue, Nebraska, particularly two rental home communities on the city’s south side. Hundreds of residents were displaced by the flooding. “That whole area was pretty well wiped clean,” the Rev. Tom Jones, rector of Church of the Holy Spirit, told Episcopal News Service.This is looking South from Fremont on Highway 77. You can see the smoke from a trailer house that Fremont Fire and Fremont Rural are battling. pic.twitter.com/HS4xMuJXsS— NSP Troop A (@NSP_TroopA) March 18, 2019The floodwaters have since subsided, and more than 5,000 Nebraskans have applied for federal assistance, according to the state. The federal disaster area includes dozens of counties throughout Nebraska and Iowa. Some displaced residents returned to find their homes and possessions destroyed by the floods, which were caused by an unusually snowy and wet winter.The Episcopal Diocese of Nebraska, while partnering with Episcopal Relief & Development, has rallied its 52 congregations behind the flood victims and, in places like Fremont and Bellevue, provided direct support to the residents most effected by the disaster and its aftermath.St. James’ began by filling tote bags with three days’ worth of toiletries and supplies for flood victims, a variation on its ministry of assembling similar donations for domestic violence victims. On April 11, the congregation resumed its regular community meals, and some residents displaced by the floods were among the 25 to 30 people who attended, Miller told ENS.Members of St. James’ Episcopal Church in Fremont, Nebraska, filled tote bags with supplies for flood victims in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. Photo: St. James’ Episcopal Church“We know that this can be an overwhelming time for people,” said Miller, the priest-in-charge at St. James’. Sunday services at the church typically draw about 25 worshippers.Her disaster response includes providing pastoral care for struggling neighbors as they cope with their flood losses; she picks up on their cues when deciding how St. James’ will follow up next. “We’re really trying to listen to folks to figure out what’s needed and how we can possibly respond,” she said.Some church members are dealing with emotional loss because the floods destroyed personal treasures, like family photos. Since others in the congregation have photos taken with the flood victims at past events, they have been encouraged to share the images, a step toward rebuilding lost photo albums.The congregation at St. James’ also is considering a “laundry love” ministry to serve the increased number of neighbors who have been forced to use laundromats because their homes and appliances were damaged.No Episcopal church facilities were seriously damaged by the flooding in Nebraska, according to the Diocese of Nebraska, though two families from Jones’ congregation in Bellevue were among those who were left homeless. At one point, the roofs of their mobile homes were barely visible above the rising Missouri River, Jones said. More than a month later, they have found permanent housing and are “very optimistic” about the future.“The community really, really came together to provide all kinds of support for the people who were impacted,” said Jones, whose average Sunday attendance is about 100. He mentioned another parishioner who offered temporary shelter to a family whose basement had been flooded, and there have been many other examples of neighbors helping neighbors. “They really came together and met those immediate needs.”His congregation also is among those getting a boost from the diocese’s work with Episcopal Relief & Development, which is providing logistical support in the relief and recovery phases. Episcopal Relief’s expertise comes from years of experience responding when natural disasters strike around the country, and this month it sent two representatives to Nebraska and Iowa “to help diocesan leaders conduct assessments of the damage caused by the flooding and to identify both immediate and long-term needs of communities,” the agency said in an online statement.Episcopal Relief & Development is helping the dioceses pay for emergency supplies for residents, such as food, gas and clothing, and Church of the Holy Spirit will use a $2,000 grant from the agency paired with $1,000 from the Diocese of Nebraska to bolster the congregation’s food distribution ministry, which is several years old.The Bellevue church, through its partnership with the Food Bank for the Heartland, had scheduled events every two months to distribute thousands of pounds of food from the Omaha-based food bank, typically serving 100 to 120 families. It now can increase the frequency of its food distribution to every month, filling a gap left by two other Bellevue churches that had decided before the flooding to stop holding distribution events.The most recent distribution was April 27, and although the number of families hadn’t increased in the wake of the floods, Jones said he saw some new faces. He thinks the need will increase as other flood relief efforts phase out.Nebraska Bishop Scott Barker applauded Episcopal Relief & Development for its support, and he praised the work of individual congregations and Episcopalians around his diocese.“I’m proud of our ability to rally to serve,” he said in an interview with ENS. “It’s a difficult bit of work, because the damage is spread over such a giant geographical area but principally in isolated pockets. … We’re trying to be really prayerful and discerning about a long-term response.”One long-term question is whether small communities in Nebraska will survive if most of the towns’ residents are told their homes are too badly damaged to return to them. Though survival isn’t in doubt for Fremont, a city of about 26,000 people northwest of Omaha, Miller said the smaller towns on Fremont’s outskirts face an uncertain future. If those residents choose to take the federal assistance and relocate elsewhere, “that place just basically disappears,” she said.For those who stay to rebuild and repair, recovery won’t happen overnight.“It’s setting in how long this is going to take,” Miller said. “I think people are feeling frustrated navigating the system, trying to figure out how the inspections work, how they get back into their homes, how to work with FEMA.”But for those who didn’t lose everything, they are approaching a difficult future while still feeling “grateful and lucky,” she said. “There’s a sense from a lot of people that it could have been worse.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Relief & Development Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By David PaulsenPosted Apr 30, 2019 Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

Episcopal churches reluctantly close their doors to 12-step meetings

first_imgEpiscopal churches reluctantly close their doors to 12-step meetings Some worry about how people in recovery will cope Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 24, 2020 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL COVID-19, Health & Healthcare Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Empty chairs are arranged in a circle typical of a 12-step recovery meeting in the parish hall at Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Memphis, Tennessee. Churches have been forced to close their buildings to 12-step meetings because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo: Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church[Episcopal News Service] As more states and cities require residents to shelter in place to slow the spread of COVID-19, coping with isolation and anxiety can be especially challenging for people whose recovery from addiction is centered on attending 12-step meetings.Episcopal Church congregations host hundreds if not thousands of Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12-step program meetings each year. Closing their buildings to those gatherings has been “one of the most painful parts of the decision-making” for churches during the pandemic, Diocese of Washington Assisting Bishop Chilton Knudsen said during a March 20 webinar to discuss the new coronavirus’s impact on family/partner violence, substance use and mental health, hosted by Episcopal Relief & Development.Members of 12-step groups typically meet in person to share their own experiences with others who also are seeking help with alcohol, narcotics, food, gambling, sex and other substance or behavioral addictions. Some agree to “sponsor,” or coach, new people who want to deal with their addictions. Most recovery programs use AA’s 12 Steps as a roadmap for recovery. There are open meetings available to anyone interested in Alcoholics Anonymous’ recovery program. Closed meetings are for members who have committed to work the AA program.As states and municipalities last week began restricting residents’ movements, Episcopal churches had to adapt. For instance, on March 20, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Eugene, Oregon, had moved its 12-step meetings into its parish hall where chairs could be spaced farther apart. Officials posted signs about new distancing rules and sanitation requirements and were in regular contact with meeting leaders, ensuring they were following the new rules.That day, Louise Fortuna, St. Mary’s communication and program coordinator, told Episcopal News Service that the church hoped to be able to remain open for those meetings, which are usually attended by more than 2,000 people each month. Less than 24 hours later, Fortuna emailed ENS to say that the church would close its buildings to comply with Oregon Gov. Kate Brown’s newest rules.Across the country in Astoria, Queens, it was the same story. An Episcopalian, who honored the AA tradition of remaining anonymous when speaking publicly about AA practices, told ENS via email early afternoon on March 20 that an AA group at his church was still meeting, albeit under strict sanitation and physical-distancing rules. Less than 12 hours later, he wrote again to say the church decided it had to close. And, he said, two Astoria recovery groups that had been meeting in a public park had suspended their gatherings and moved online.“So, it’s now all online for us,” said the man, who is nine months sober and who chairs an AA meeting elsewhere, which he had already reconfigured online.“Those of us in AA are most concerned about isolation,” he said in his email. “In the meeting I chair, I remind everyone that they must not isolate or let anyone else isolate and that each person must contact at least one other person in the program daily.”Churches that have had to close their buildings to 12-step meetings have posted signs on the doors to that effect, often adding the phone number of AA’s intergroup or regional office, which maintains lists of meetings and locations.Like Knudsen, the Episcopalian in Queens said he was concerned about people who need and want to get help with their addiction. It’s so hard to come to that first meeting, he said, and having someone to go with them can help. “I’d plead with people everywhere to stay in touch and, if they have concerns about others, to gently and lovingly ask about this habit, if they’ve considered life without such a substance, and offer whatever resources that might be available,” he said.AA has offered phone meetings and chat rooms for years, Knudsen told ENS. The move to online video meetings is the next step, she said. However, she acknowledged during the webinar that they might be “a poor second to sitting around a table, looking each other in the eye, putting an arm around a shoulder, sharing a cup of coffee, ending in a circle with hands joined with the Lord’s Prayer. All of those are precious rituals to those of us who are in recovery, and it’s sad when we can’t have those things.”There are other ways to stay connected beyond meetings. Each member of an AA meeting gets what Knudsen called a “gentle orientation” to resources that are available to them. Some are offered by the national Alcoholics Anonymous organization, and some are as simple as the phone list of group members who agree to receive phone calls from other members. She said a friend told her she is working her way through her group’s list, checking on members.Meanwhile, “no doubt, there are people who are going to suffer; their recovery is going to be compromised,” Knudsen said. “But people who are really committed to their own recovery will find a way to get those needs met.”She said “no church should carry a burden of guilt thinking that somehow closing their building is dooming all of these 12-step meetings to massive relapse. The church is not responsible for any one person’s recovery; that person is.”To that end, during the March 20 webinar Knudsen, who traces the beginning of her recovery to May 24, 1987, told people in recovery to “kick up your program.”“If you’ve kind of let it slide, if you have gotten sloppy or if you haven’t attended meetings or you aren’t working your steps actively, get back on track because this is a time when your recovery can be a gift to other people, and if you strengthen your recovery, it’ll be good for you and for others.”In New England, an Episcopal priest who has been in recovery for 30 years told ENS March 23 that, during a video meeting earlier in the day, a member said, “The program works whether we’re together or not.”From Memphis, an Episcopalian in recovery told ENS in an email that “the problem with all facilities closing and moving to virtual meetings is for the person yet to find us and the newcomers. Many don’t have smartphones, internet/WiFi, laptops, or money to buy all those things. What’s going to happen to them?”The Episcopal Church has deep roots in the recovery movement Episcopal priest the Rev. Samuel Shoemaker, who died in 1963, has been called one of Alcoholics Anonymous’ “indispensables.” Photo: Alcoholics AnonymousNot only have Episcopal churches opened their doors to AA and other 12-step meetings for decades, but also William Griffith Wilson, the AA co-founder known as Bill W., once called the Rev. Samuel Shoemaker, an Episcopal priest, one of the program’s “indispensables.”“Had it not been for his ministry to us in our early time, our Fellowship would not be in existence today,” he wrote, saying that Shoemaker “passed on the spiritual keys by which we were liberated.” The first three steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, the starting point for sobriety in the AA program, were inspired in part by Shoemaker, according to AA history.Knudsen called the Baltimore native “an icon” in the recovery movement. Shoemaker is commemorated on The Episcopal Church’s calendar on Jan. 31.The Episcopal Church does not have an “abstemious tradition” that prohibited alcohol consumption as do some Baptists or, in the past, Methodists, Knudsen noted, and she said because of the influence of Shoemaker and others, the church has “a more open and enlightened attitude to the whole spectrum of addictive disease.”In recent years The Episcopal Church has begun to face its attitude toward drinking. It passed three resolutions at the 2018 General Convention to address alcohol and substance misuse and behavioral addictions, especially among its leaders.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg retired in July as Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter.last_img read more

Oxfam achieves 77% Gift Aid reclaim using online sponsorship tool

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  35 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Oxfam’s online events fundraising with Bmycharity has achieved impressive Gift Aid results, outperforming average sector Gift Aid conversions by nearly 300%.Oxfam has demonstrated one of the key benefits of events fundraising online by collecting Gift Aid on a record proportion of donated funds. Oxfam Trailwalkers and Marathon runners have raised over £85,000 online and Oxfam has received a further £18,500 in Gift Aid. This represents a Gift Aid reclaim rate of 77% on all donated funds. This contrasts starkly with the average Gift Aid reclamation rate which, according to The Giving Campaign, is only 20%.Because most event participants have a target which does not include Gift Aid, the additional benefit goes straight through to help Oxfam’s work. For example, a Marathon runner traditionally raising £2,000 for Oxfam normally raises an additional £435 at no extra cost to Oxfam, themselves or their supporters when fundraising online with Bmycharity. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis These exceptional Gift Aid reclamation rates are made possible by the ease and security with which donors can give Gift Aid consent online using Bmycharity’s Inland Revenue-approved paperless process. By collecting donation data online, Oxfam is also able to record and analyse the details of all donors, rather than receiving a collection from the event participant, so future events can be effectively targeted for the best fundraisers and donors.John Mercer, Fundraising Events Manager at Oxfam, said: “Oxfam’s online events fundraising with Bmycharity has proven very popular with our trekkers, runners and Trailwalkers – and now it is possible for groups and teams to use our Bmycharity site to fundraise. By working with Bmycharity we are able to maximise the value of our Gift Aid and project the Oxfam brand around the globe.”Commenting on the results, Peter Gilheany, Communications Manager for The Giving Campaign, said: “These are really impressive results, and show just how effective online fundraising can be in maximising Gift Aid – and what a difference Gift Aid can make in raising much needed extra funds for charity. I hope Oxfam’s example will inspire other charities to take advantage of the scheme.”center_img Howard Lake | 15 July 2003 | News Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Digital Events Research / statistics Oxfam achieves 77% Gift Aid reclaim using online sponsorship toollast_img read more

ESF funding call in N Ireland

first_img Tagged with: Funding Northern Ireland AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 ESF funding call in N Ireland The Department for the Economy in Northern Ireland is opening a new round of funding under the European Social Fund (ESF).The Department will accept applications from 11 September until noon on 13 October 2017 for this second call under the programme. The programme will fund activity to enhance and extend employment opportunities, in particular, for those groups at a disadvantage in the labour market who are unemployed, including long term unemployed, or economically inactive.There will also be a focus on supporting young people aged 16-24 who are not in employment, education or training and on people with a disability. The ESF programme compliments significant funding already provided through existing departmental strategies, policies and programmesThe aim of the ESF programme will be realised through the implementation of four objectives:• Priority 1: Access to Employment – promoting sustainable and quality employment and supporting labour mobility• Priority 2: Social Inclusion – promoting social inclusion and combating poverty and any discrimination• Priority 3: Skills for Growth – investing in education, training and vocational training for skills and life-long• Priority 4: Technical Assistance – the Technical Assistance (TA) allocation for the Northern Ireland European Social Fund programmeSixty five projects, mostly in the charitable sector, with a total value of £105 million, are currently operational under the 1st call of funding. The period of funding offered runs from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2018.  148 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Howard Lake | 1 September 2017 | News  147 total views,  1 views today The Department is hosting two information events about the funding – in Cookstown on 5 September and 7 September in Belfast. Details and registration is on the website. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

It’s not Iran’s military power that frightens the U.S.

first_imgPublished in jornalmudardevida.net on Jan. 31. Translation by John Catalinotto.Jan. 31 — The crisis that the U.S. created with Iran, which the Trump gang pushed to the brink of war, has nothing to do with the proclaimed “danger” of the Iranians making an atomic bomb. It is not that they had no desire to have it — or that they did not deserve to have it (in our opinion, they did) to more effectively defend their independence, as the case of North Korea seems to prove. The U.S. rage has other grounds. A mourner in Iran holds a portrait of Iranian General Qassem Soleimani, assassinated by U.S. military drone in Iraq on Jan. 2.The point is that Iran, in the 40 years of independence it has enjoyed since the 1979 revolution, has become a country free from imperialist tutelage, whether U.S. or European imperialism. That is the crux of the matter.Independence has enabled Iran, thanks in particular to oil, to develop economically and socially, placing it light years ahead of what the country was in the days of Shah Reza Pahlevi [ruled 1953-79]. In addition, despite the regime’s religious ideology, it is way ahead of the dictatorial regimes of the Arabian peninsula, which the U.S. and European imperialists are so keen to keep in power.All the reports by the International Atomic Energy Agency — the U.N. body charged with monitoring Iran’s compliance with the 2015 agreement with the U.S., France, Britain, Germany, Russia and China — declare that the Iranians committed no violations. Furthermore, apart from Trump’s U.S., no other signatory has accused Iran of failing to comply with its commitments. The reason for U.S. aggressiveness arises elsewhere.The Trump administration’s anti-Iran campaign, joined by Boris Johnson’s Britain, has a very concrete purpose: to prevent Iran from becoming a regional (namely economic) power that could change the so-called “balance” in the Middle East — which is already happening. Now, this “balance,” which Britain set up historically and then the U.S. and its European allies maintained, is actually an absolute imbalance of forces with the imperialist powers in control and with the U.S. at the head.This imbalance is the aim of the economic sanctions imposed on Iran. Always under U.S. command, they began in 1979, after the revolution that deposed the shah. Under various pretexts, they have been repeatedly maintained, re-imposed or strengthened by all U.S. presidents since then. In 40 years, they have only been relaxed for short periods: from 1981 to 1987, following the Algiers agreements, which ended the so-called “hostage crisis”; and from 2015 to 2018 by virtue of the multilateral agreement that Trump eventually tore up. As is well known, Israel — which the U.S. has provided with nuclear weapons in violation of all the relevant treaties — and the Arab dictatorships, are the main agents of imperialism in the region, charged with maintaining that imbalance.This is how the world’s most important sources of energy remain under U.S. and European domination. And also because an overwhelming military presence has been perpetuated for decades throughout the region — using military bases on land, naval squadrons, the latest generation of war material and thousands of troops.Iran, especially since the U.S. occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq in 2001 and 2003, committed itself to breaking the siege to which it was subjected. Iran did this either by taking position in an Iraq torn apart by U.S. barbarism or by establishing contacts in Afghanistan with the Taliban resistance. (Iran succeeded to the extent of acting as a mediator between the Taliban and the U.S.)On the other hand, Iran’s anti-imperialist and anti-Zionist stance gained it sympathy in Lebanon, the Gaza Strip and Syria. Iran established alliances in particular with the Hezbollah and Hamas movements and the Syrian government. The same goes for the Houthi rebels in Yemen, based on their opposition to Saudi aggression.Considering Iran’s political influence unacceptable, Washington calls it “terrorist action,” thereby trying to cover up its own acts of state terrorism –  such as the assassination of General Qassem Soleimani. In addition, Iran’s trade agreements and political rapprochement with Russia and China have helped it to sustain Teheran’s economic and political independence on the international scene, despite the sanctions and demonization to which the Western powers have subjected Iran.Iran’s capacity for resistance is a major headache for U.S. imperialism. It also terrifies U.S. client states in the region, whose rulers can only stay in control based on U.S. power. It is all the more worrying for Washington and its puppets that Iran’s alliance with Russia and China favors the influence of these two powers in the region. And the influence of China and Russia tends to expand and consolidate because it is based on a decisive argument: China’s growing economic power, for which neither the U.S. nor Europe shows any antidotes.The decline of U.S. hegemony in the Middle East is part of the general decline of U.S. imperialism. This decline opens the way for the expansion of the new global state powers. It also exacerbates the dispute between old and new powers. It is this decline that to a great extent explains why Europeans and other U.S. allies have recently accused the White House of “unpredictability” regarding the direction of its foreign policy.It is also this decline that makes it possible to understand and expose the growing belligerence of the entire Trump foreign policy — tearing up agreements, breaking alliances, seeking new partners, strengthening mercenary ties with outlaw states (such as, in this case, Israel and Saudi Arabia), unashamedly threatening war and destruction in all directions. Ultimately, the sole focus of U.S. power is becoming its use of military weapons.But the decline of the U.S. also represents an opening for the peoples’ struggle to develop and gain new dimensions. Despite the religious and reactionary nature of Iran’s Ayatollah-led regime, Iran, in serving the interest of a powerful national bourgeoisie, is confronting imperialism as very few national leaderships have the courage to do these days.It is in this capacity as an anti-imperialist force — and as long as it remains so — that Iran must be unequivocally supported by the European and global left. Iran’s struggle will help to erode and bring down the main enemy of the people today, the main war maker threatening all of humanity: U.S. imperialist capitalism.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

RSF asks French police to protect Breton reporter, investigate threat to her life

first_img May 10, 2021 Find out more RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story FranceEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Environment Morgan Large (Damien MEYER/AFP) Organisation News Help by sharing this information RSF_en Reporters Without Borders (RSF) and Morgan Large, an investigative reporter in Brittany, in northwestern France, whose car was sabotaged two weeks ago, have jointly filed a judicial complaint requesting an investigation into the threat to her life and calling for her to be given police protection. Large specialises in covering Brittany’s agribusiness. Filed yesterday with the public prosecutor’s office in Saint‑Brieuc, in Brittany’s Côtes d’Armor department, and signed by lawyers Emmanuel Daoud et Maxime Tessier, the complaint reports acts constituting “destruction, degradation or deterioration of property (…) likely to create a danger to persons” under article 322-6 of the penal code and “concerted interference with freedom of expression” under article 431-1 of the penal code.RSF had announced that it was considering legal action when it first reported that Large’s car had been the target of a malicious act of sabotage. Large works for Radio Kreiz Breizh (RKB), a community radio station based near Rostrenen, a small town 60 km southwest of Saint‑Brieuc.On 31 March, Large noticed that all the nuts had disappeared from one of the real wheels of her car. This could not have accidental, according to the garage mechanic whose statement was included in the complaint. It was clearly a deliberate act of sabotage designed to put her life in danger, one that also endangered all of the car’s other users, including her daughter.The complaint details other acts of harassment and intimidation against Large and her radio station in recent months, including the poisoning of her dog, anonymous night-time phone calls to her home, the fact that her domestic animals were let loose, and the damaging of the radio station’s doors. The complaint also refers to the general climate of intimidation for journalists covering intensive farming and environmental issues in Brittany.Although just the latest in a long series of acts of sabotage, the level of malice and danger crossed a threshold that constitutes grounds for a criminal investigation and, as RSF told the prosecutor, for Large to be given police protection.As the threats to Large and the radio station seem to be part of a broader climate of tension in Rostrenen and the surrounding area, RSF has also called for the case to be assigned to an external police agency instead of the local gendarmerie.France is ranked 34th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. News Follow the news on Francecenter_img to go further News “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says June 2, 2021 Find out more News April 14, 2021 RSF asks French police to protect Breton reporter, investigate threat to her life June 4, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts FranceEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Environment Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EUlast_img read more