Medicinal Herbs

first_imgIn the last year, the medicinal herb program at UGArden, the University of Georgia’s student-run farm, has expanded its product line and the number of students involved has expanded substantially.This fall, as they prepared locally grown and locally made teas, salves and soaps for their annual holiday market, students were excited about the program’s growth and the community that has sprung up around the program. “It’s cool because there are all these students in different programs that wouldn’t necessarily be coming out to a farm,” said Noelle Fuller, the program’s manager. “They get hands-on experience with different parts of this student-run business, and it’s accessible to a lot of people.”Fuller, a trained herbalist who received a bachelor’s degree in nutrition science and a master’s degree in horticulture from UGA, started as a volunteer in the herb garden at UGArden while she was a student in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. When she graduated with her master’s degree last summer, she started managing the herb program.This year’s growth has been due, in large part, to a $20,000 grant issued by UGA’s Office of Experiential Learning in early 2018. The grant funded Fuller’s part-time position and supported the herb program’s expansion across campus.Each year, the Office of Experiential Learning distributes two grants to fund innovative and impactful experiential learning projects on campus. The UGArden medicinal tea program was one of the first recipients, said Scott Pegan, interim director of the Office of Experiential Learning.“Experiential learning at the University of Georgia gives students hands-on opportunities to connect their academic foundations to the world beyond the classroom in ways that change their perspective and insight,” Pegan said. “The Office of Experiential Learning offers more than 70 competitive scholarships for students to use toward approved activities each year. Students participate in activities locally, across the state, country and world … Experiential learning challenges our students and is one more reason they are a step ahead of the competition.”The grant has allowed Fuller to have much more hands-on time with students in the garden, she said. Every week volunteers and interns drive out to UGArden’s property to process dried herbs, work in the field, harvest plants and maintain the garden.While the herb garden has grown, Fuller has also worked to grow the impact of the program across campus, forming partnerships with students from CAES and from many other colleges.The UGArden Herb Program has worked with the Terry College of Business entrepreneurship certificate program, the Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, and the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication New Media Institute. All three capstone programs worked on promotional items like marketing, outreach, branding, a sustainable business model, a new website and a record-keeping app.Students in a First-Year Odyssey class, called “Local Food Entrepreneurship,” staffed the holiday market. They had been studying the business model of the herb program all semester, Fuller said.Fuller is passionate about getting students of all strengths involved, whether they’re working in the field or thinking up sustainable business models.“We’re trying to make it very holistic by giving students opportunities to be involved in the business in different ways and by incorporating a bunch of different perspectives,” Fuller said. “There are students that would never come out to work on the farm, but they can now help in other aspects of the business.”The success of the program wouldn’t be possible without the legion of students who work with the program or without the community members and customers that have helped support the garden by buying its teas and other products.The program now markets 10 all-natural herbal teas, holiday bath and beauty boxes, salves, lip balms, infused oils, locally grown loofahs and a new shiitake mushroom seasoning blends.For more information about the UGArden Medicinal Herb Program, visit ugarden.uga.edu/medicinal-teas. For more information about how UGA supports experiential learning, visit el.uga.edu/resources.last_img read more

World Tourism Barometer: In 2019, there was a solid increase in international arrivals of 4 percent

first_imgUNWTO confidence index However, some large emerging markets, such as Brazil and Saudi Arabia, have reported reductions in tourism costs. China, the world’s largest outbound market, saw an 2019 percent increase in outbound travel in the first half of 14, although spending fell 4 percent. Responsible growth Predictions of international tourist arrivals Tourism provides “much needed opportunities” In 2019, 1,5 billion international tourist arrivals were recorded globally. This is an increase of 4 percent compared to the previous year, and the same is projected for 2020, which confirms tourism as the leading economic sector, especially given the current uncertainties. This growth must be managed responsibly to make the most of the opportunities that tourism can create for communities around the world. Source / photo: World Tourism Organization Presenting the results, UNWTO Secretary-General Zurab Pololikashvili stressed that “in times of uncertainty and instability, tourism remains a reliable economic sector“. In light of the recently declining global economic prospects, international trade tensions, social unrest and geopolitical insecurity, “our sector is constantly surpassing the world economy and invites us not only to grow, but to grow for the betterHe added. Given the position of tourism as a top export sector and job creator, the UNWTO advocates the need for responsible growth. Tourism, therefore, has a place at the heart of global development policies and an opportunity to gain additional political recognition and make a real impact. You can find more about the world’s latest tourist barometer HERE. In 2019, the Middle East became the fastest growing region in terms of international tourist arrivals, growing almost twice the global average (+ 8%). Growth in Asia and the Pacific is somewhat slower, but it still showed above-average growth with 5 percent more international arrivals.center_img International tourist arrivals Europe, where growth has also been slower than in previous years (+ 4%), remains the leader in terms of international arrivals, recording 743 million international tourists last year (51% of the global market). The Americas (+ 2%) showed a mixed picture as many island destinations in the Caribbean accelerated their recovery after the 2017 hurricane, while arrivals in South America declined in part due to constant social and political turmoil. Limited data available for Africa (+ 4%) indicate a solid increase in North Africa (+ 9%), while arrivals in sub-Saharan Africa in 2019 grew somewhat more slowly (+ 1,5%). Spending in tourism remains high “The number of destinations earning a billion dollars or more from international tourism has almost doubled since 1998”, Adds Pololikashvili. “The challenge we face is to ensure that the benefits are shared as widely as possible and that no one is left behind. This year, the UNWTO is celebrating the Year of Tourism and Rural Development and we hope to witness positive changes in rural communities in our sector, job creation and opportunities, leading economic growth and preserving culture.” In the context of a global slowdown in economic growth, tourism consumption continued to grow, especially among the top ten consumers in the world. France reported the strongest increase in international tourism spending among the top ten world exit markets (+ 11%), while the United States (+ 6%) led in absolute growth, aided by a strong dollar. Looking ahead, growth is projected at 3 to 4 percent for 2020. This is a look that is reflected in the most current UNWTO confidence index, which shows cautious optimism: 47 percent of participants believe that tourism will achieve better results, and 43 percent believe that it will be at the same level as in 2019. Major sporting events, including the Tokyo Olympics, and cultural events, such as Expo 2020 in Dubai, are expected to have a positive impact on the sector. The Middle East is leading According to the first comprehensive report on global tourism figures and trends of the new decade, the latest tourism barometer of the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), last year was the tenth year in a row that growth was recorded. All regions recorded an increase in international arrivals in 2019. However, uncertainty over Brexit, the collapse of Thomas Cook, geopolitical and social tensions, and a slowdown in the global economy have contributed to slower growth in 2019 compared to exceptional rates in 2017 and 2018. This slowdown has affected mainly more advanced economies, in particular Europe, Asia and the Pacific.last_img read more

Quad City Speedway hosts Mother’s Day Deery Series show

first_imgEAST MOLINE, Ill. (May 9) – A Mother’s Day show at Quad City Speedway is next on the schedule for the Deery Brothers Summer Series.Touring IMCA Late Models race for $2,000 to win and a minimum $300 to start their Sunday, May 14 main event at East Moline.Tour rookie Jake Neal of Omaha, Neb., leads the point standings heading into the sixth series event of the season. Luke Goedert of Guttenberg, Iowa, is in second, two points off the pace and just nine points separate the first and fifth place drivers.Pit gates open at 3 p.m. and the grandstand opens at 3:30 p.m. Sunday. Hot laps are at 5:15 p.m. with racing to follow.Box seating is $18 while other spectator admission is $15 for adults, $8 for kids ages 6-12 and free for five and under. Pit passes are $30.Also running are IMCA Modifieds and Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods. All applicable points, including local track, will be awarded in all three IMCA divisions.More information is available by calling 309 792-5030 and at the www.qcspeedwayracing.com website.Nineteen previous Deery events have been held at East Moline. Joel Callahan of Dubuque, Iowa, was the winner there last May.Deery Brothers Summer Series top 20 point standings – 1. Jake Neal, Omaha, Neb., 175; 2. Luke Goedert, Guttenberg, Iowa, 173; 3. Matt Ryan, Davenport, Iowa, 170; 4. Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa, Iowa, 169; 5. Jesse Sobbing, Malvern, Iowa, 166; 6. Chad Holladay, Muscatine, Iowa, 160; 7. Curt Martin, Independence, Iowa, 155; 8. Jeremiah Hurst, Dubuque, and Jeff Tharp, Sher­rill, Iowa, both 150; 10. Richie Gustin, Gilman, Iowa, 148; 11. Darrel DeFrance, Marshalltown, Iowa, 143; 12. Joel Callahan, Dubuque, Iowa, 140; 13. Justin Kay, Wheatland, Iowa, 117; 14. Tyler Bruening, Decorah, Iowa, and Paul Conrad, Colo, Iowa, both 110; 16. Jeff Aikey, Cedar Falls, Iowa, 109; 17. Curt Schroeder, Newton, Iowa, 101; 18. John Emer­son, Waterloo, Iowa, 91; 19. Nick Marolf, Wilton, Iowa, and Jay Johnson, West Burlington, Iowa, both 90.last_img read more